Ktown Night Market in L.A.

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Ktown Night Market in L.A.

 Ktown Night Market Concert

Ktown Night Market Concert

What is it about different cultures coming together and combining their vision of food, creating an eclectic edge? There’s a feeling that pulses between the hustle of vendors, aroma of fusion cuisine and live music. I’m talking about the Ktown Night Market, a two-day event held monthly during the summer at various locations throughout Koreatown and Downtown Los Angeles. Tonight’s event takes place at The RFK Community Schools Complex, a former site of the Ambassador Hotel and the famous “Cocoanut Grove.” Celebrities known to have frequented the historic venues include Frank Sinatra, Sammy Davis Jr. and Anna May Wong among others. As time has passed a unique charm of the area still remains as festivities go on to intrigue guests.

 Grilled Lobster Claw and Tail

Grilled Lobster Claw and Tail

Ktown Night Market is a gathering of local vendors, food trucks, musicians and celebrities like Heesun Lee and Awkwafina. Wandering through the endless options of fusion food and never-ending lines, maybe you’re wondering what dishes to try. Perhaps Grilled Lobster or Sriracha Fried Shrimps from Claw ‘N Tail? Possibly Lamb Steak on a skewer? Yes, the tasty and tender savory goodness of grilled meats on a stick! Where else will you see diverse cultures walking around with handheld foods or that special something that’s a bit messier?

 Making ramen

Making ramen

 Okonomi Fries

Okonomi Fries

The sweet love I have for Japanese Fusion. I’m talking about Okamoto Kitchen’s crispy fries drizzled with Okonomiyaki-style Okonomi sauce. Made of Kewpie Mayo, aonori, greens, red ginger, and bonito flakes, the layers of flavor really get your taste buds’ attention. It’s mix of sweet, savory, and crispy all in one sloppy bite. The Kewpie Mayo’s delectable taste combined with the light airy french fry is a match made in heaven. If there were such a thing as french-fried love fused with Japanese cuisine, it would be “The Notebook” of foodie romances.

 Cheeseburger Monster wrapped in Fried Potato Chips

Cheeseburger Monster wrapped in Fried Potato Chips

If you’re not an adventurous foodie, the Indiana Jones of the Fork, then opt for something like the Cheeseburger wrapped in Fried Potato Chips. This culinary creation is a beefy cheesy melted baby wrapped in a blanket of crunchy goodness. A person with a lesser heart could not handle this dish as the grease is a complimentary palate cleanser. While you’re at it, chow down on ramen, Korean BBQ, boba tea, and desserts like Matcha Milk Spread from Tak’s Dessert.

 Tak's Dessert Matcha Spread

Tak's Dessert Matcha Spread

 Kore Limited on-screen during the concert

Kore Limited on-screen during the concert

 Pamper yourself with eyelash extensions

Pamper yourself with eyelash extensions

So you’re feeling full and satisfied. You wonder, “What else there is to do?” There are Carnival style games, making it a family-friendly event or fun date night. Ktown Night Market also hosts a variety of local businesses from Koreatown. Notable mentions include Kore Limited and Soaporo’s Natural Handmade Soaps. If you're running low on energy while dancing to musical guests such as Ashley Yoon and Coco Avenue, there is a remedy: drink Vision Smart’s Vision and Sport Sparkle Natural Energy Supplement. That juice will keep your rhythm flowing. Vendors provide attendees with a plethora of goods, catering to their many possible needs.

 Vendor deep-frying sea cucumbers

Vendor deep-frying sea cucumbers

 Deep-fried sea cucumbers

Deep-fried sea cucumbers

Whether you bite into a Deep Fried Sea Cucumber or something more adventurous, Ktown Night Market is certainly the standard for showcasing what Koreatown and the Greater L.A. Area has to offer. Foodies and people from all walks of life come together and enjoy this melting pot of cultural fusion food.

When's the next Ktown Night Market? Click here.


garrett t

When Garrett T. is not eating, he is writing foodie romance novels. Follow him on Twitter for his latest culinary adventures!


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BAD WORDS in Korean

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BAD WORDS in Korean

Today we’re getting bad to the bone. Whether you’re a Kpop fan, a Korean drama addict, or just plain interested in Korea, you gotta know today’s featured word because you’ll see it over and over and over again: 나쁘다 (na-bbeu-da). 나쁘다 (nadbbeuda) means bad and poor. Poor as in low quality. Here are some phrases using 나쁘다:

Note: The following phrases are informal, so use them towards those your age or younger.

기분 진짜 나쁘다. 넌 어때?
Giboon jinjja nabbeudah. Nun uhddae?
I’m in a really bad mood. How about you?

나쁘다 너… 정말 못됐어.
Nabbeudah nuh… Jungmal motdwaessuh.
You’re bad… You’re really mean.

저 남자 성격 진짜 나쁘다.
Juh namja sunggyuk jinjja nabbeudah.
That man has a very bad personality.


나쁘다 can be conjugated into 나쁜. Then you can place a noun after it. For example:

나쁜 말 (nabbeun mal) = bad word
나쁜 남자 (nabbeun namja) = bad guy
나쁜 놈 (nabbeun nom) = bad guy, jerk, son of a gun
나쁜 피 (nabbeun pee) = bad blood (Hey, that's the name of Taylor Swift's song!)

Here are some Korean movie titles using 나쁜:
나쁜놈은 죽는다 (nabbeun nomeun jukneunda) = Bad Guys Always Die
나쁜 사랑 (nabbeun sarang) = Bad Love
나쁜 나라 (nabbeun nara) = Bad Nation, aka: Cruel State
나쁜 이웃들 (nabbeun eootdeul) = Bad Neighbors. This one's an American flick!
나쁜 교육 (nabbeun gyoyuk) = Bad Education. A Spanish film!


Onto some Korean drama-ish phrases using 나쁜. You can also use them in real life. No one’s stopping you.

넌 정말 나쁜 놈이야. 알아?
Nun jungmal nabbeun nomeya. Ara?
You’re a really bad guy. Do you know that?

아 참나... 왜 자꾸 나쁜 일만 생기지?
Ah chamna… Wae jaggoo nabbeun ilman senggiji?
What the heck… Why do only bad things keep happening?

나쁜 말 또하면 맴매한다.
Nabbeun mal ddohamyun memmaehandah.
If you say bad words again, I’m going to spank you.

나쁜 기억 다 지워버려.
Nabbeun giyuk dah jiwoburyuh.
Erase all the bad memories.

야, 넌 입 열 때마다 왜 나쁜 말만 나와?
Ya, nun eep yul ddaemada wae nabbeun malman nawa?
Hey, how come every time you open your mouth, only bad words come out?

나쁜 소식 들어서 입맛이 떨어졌어.
Nabbeun soshik deuluhsuh eepmatshi dduluhjyeossuh.
I lost my appetite after hearing the bad news.


나쁘다 has many other conjugations. Here are some examples:

미안해, 기분 나쁘게 해서.
Mianhae, giboon nabbeugye haesuh.
I’m sorry for putting you in a bad mood.

영화 어땠어? 좋았어? 나빴어?
Younghwa uhddessuh? Joassuh? Nabbassuh?
How was the movie? Was it good? Was it bad?

나빴어. 우리 같이 간다고 그랬잖아.
Nabbassuh. Oori gatchi gandago geuretjanah. You’re bad.
You said we would go together.

사장님 앞에선 조심해 기분 나빠도.
Sajangnim apaesun joshimhae giboon nabbado.
Be careful in front of the boss, even if you’re in a bad mood.


So we learned about the bad. what about the good? The opposite of bad is 좋다 (jota). You can use it to describe anything, whether it’s a person or non-living object. Just like how we use “good” in English.

오늘 날씨 좋다.
Oneul nalsshi jota.
The weather is good today.

운동해서 그런지 기분이 좋다.
Oondonghaesuh geurunji gibooni jota.
Maybe it’s because I exercised, but I feel good.

이 차 좋다.
Ee cha jota.
This car is good.

That is a wrap for this week's lesson. Tune in next week on my YouTube channel to learn more about Korea!

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Why Koreans say GUCCI all the time

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Why Koreans say GUCCI all the time

Viewers and friends have asked me many times before: why do Koreans say "gucci" so much? Are they talking about fashion or am I mistaking it for something else?

Sometimes they are talking about Gucci the brand. Most of the time, they are saying 그치 (geuchi). 그치 means “isn’t it?” and “right?” 그치 is an agreeing expression. It can be used a both a statement and a question.

Question: 그치? Right?
Statement: 그치! Right!

For the fashionistas out there, the Korean way of saying Gucci the brand is 구찌 (goo-jjee). “Right?" and "Isn’t it” is 그치 (geuchi). 구찌 (goo-jjee) and 그치 (geu-chi) may sound similar, but knowing how to pronounce the subtle differences make a huge impact.

Here’s an example using both 구찌 and 그치:

네 가방… 구찌지, 그치?
Ne gabang… goojjeeji, geuchi?
Your bag… It’s Gucci, right?

그치, 난 구찌만 사.
Geuchi, nan goojjeeman sa.
Right, I only buy Gucci.


When I lived in LA for seven years, a lot of girls and guys would say, “RIGHTTT~~~?” It didn’t matter if they were a stranger or a friend. If I said something was cute or delicious, they would reply in agreement… RIGHT~? You can think of 그치 (geuchi) as the Korean version of "Right~?" Except in my experience, "Right~?" tends to be used by young people and 그치 (geuchi) is used by all ages.

CONVERSATION AT THE RESTAURANT:
와~ 이 갈비 진짜 맛있다!
Wah~ E galbi jinjja masshitda!
Oh gawd, these short ribs are super delicious!

그치? 많이 먹자!
Geuchi? Mani mukja!
Right? Isn’t it? Let’s eat tons!


CONVERSATION WITH FANGIRLS:
태양 노래 진짜 잘 불러.
Taeyang norae jinjja jal boolluh.
Taeyang is really good at singing.

그치? 어제 홍대에서 봤어.
Geuchi? Uhjae hongdae-aesuh bwassuh.
Right? Isn’t he? I saw him at Hongdae yesterday.


CONVERSATION WITH GRANDMA:
Grandma: 어느 색이 나? 이거 아니면 이거?
Uhneu segi na? Eguh animyun eguh?
Which color is better? This one or this one?

Girl: 파란게 더 잘 어울려요, 할머니.
Parangeh duh jal uhoollyuyo, halmuhni.
The blue one fits you more, Grandma.

Grandma: 그치? 나도 그 생각 했어.
Geuchi? Nado geu senggak haessuh.
Right? I was thinking that, too.


그치 (geuchi) is informal. The FORMAL way of saying it is 그쵸 (geuchyo). Use 그치 (geuchi) towards friends and those younger than you. 그쵸 (geuchyo) is used towards your elders and in situations you’d like to be formal.

오늘 날씨 좋아요, 그쵸?
Uneul nalsshi joayo, geuchyo?
The weather is great today, right?

제가 만들었지만, 이 잡채 참 맛있어요. 그쵸?
Jega mandeulutjiman, e japchae cham masshissuhyo, geuchyo?
I know I’m the one who made it, but this japchae is pretty delicious. Right?

그쵸. 누구 한테서 배우셨는데요?
Geuchyo, nugu hantaesuh bae-oohshyutneundeyo?
Right. Who’s the one who taught you?

그치 (geuchi) and 그쵸 (geuchyo) are shortened versions of 그렇지 (geu-ruh-chi) and 그렇죠 (geu-ruh-chyo). 그치 and 그쵸 are used often in spoken form. 그렇지 and 그렇죠 are more proper and seen in books. When text messaging, Koreans often use the shorter versions as it is faster to type and gets the point across. It’s like saying SEE YA or CU, instead of “I’ll see you later.”

Hope you enjoyed learning the subtle yet important differences of Gucci and Geuchi. See you next week on my YouTube channel for more on Korea!

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