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Pepero Kimchi Very Bbechi (Snack Tub Korea #6)

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Pepero Kimchi Very Bbechi (Snack Tub Korea #6)

Today we eat three flavors of Pepero (빼빼로): the original chocolate, almond and nude. Pepero is similar to the Japanese Pocky, another bisquit stick dipped in chocolate. Interestingly Lotte, the company that owns Pepero, was founded by Shin Kyuk-ho, a Japanese businessman of Korean ancestry. Shin's younger brother is the chairman of Nongshim, which is famed for their Onion Rings and Shrimp Crackers. I eat them in later episodes of Snack Tub Korea. I digress. Let's get in the tub and find out which flavor of Pepero rocks Professor Oh's taste buds!

We begin with the Original Pepero. Please eat with care. Place your hands on the top of the plastic packaging so you do not melt the chocolate. Everyone will enjoy Pepero. Your mom, your future lover, your pet rock. But seriously it's a simple yet likeable snack.

Ever heard of Pepero Day? Celebrated on 11/11 since the ones look like the bisquit sticks, Koreans pass out boxes of these goodies to their family and friends. Special edition Peperos are sold in stores, including gigantic ones. Other people like to homemake their chocolate-covered sticks.

The Nude Pepero is the Original Pepero flipped into out: bisquit on the outside, chocolate in the inside. The Nude sticks are thicker than the Original sticks. Because of the bisquit to chocolate ratio, the Nude Pepero tastes more bland. I prefer the Original.

 Professor Oh smoking a stick of Nude Pepero.

Professor Oh smoking a stick of Nude Pepero.

Last but not least we try the Almond Pepero. She's the edgy and wild one of the three. I confess I'm partial to almonds. However from an objective point of view, Almond Pepero beats the Original.

Original Pepero = 5 out of 5 kpop stars. Recommended for kids.

Nude Pepero = 4 out of 5 kpop stars. For adults who prefer mild flavor.

Almond Pepero = 6 out of 5 kpop stars. Recommended for the next generation human beings.

Time for some improv cooking. Using today’s snacks we make Pepero Kimchi.

Happy responsible snacking! Don’t forget to eat your carrots and peas :)

  Professor Oh amazed by the Almond Pepero. The experience is comparable to seeing a unicorn for the first time. I'm not exaggerating at all.

Professor Oh amazed by the Almond Pepero. The experience is comparable to seeing a unicorn for the first time. I'm not exaggerating at all.



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12 Fun & Easy Korean Expressions & Sounds

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12 Fun & Easy Korean Expressions & Sounds

Want to sound like a native Korean? Or just plain desire to understand more of your favorite Korean dramas? Watch KWOW #110 to learn some popular Korean expressions and sounds (below).

There are tons, tons, tons of Korean expressions and sounds. Some are classics while others are passing trends. Here's the list of the ones featured in the episode:

  1. Aish/아이씨: darnit, ah crap, oh man
  2. Nyam nyam nyam/냠냠냠: munching sounds, the Korean way of saying America's "nom nom nom"
  3. Ae/에이: roughly translates to "Aw~ Come on," can sound highly aegyo depending on how you say it, use when someone rejects your request
  4. Uh/어: heard often when Koreans are on the phone, the Korean way of saying "yeah" and "uhuh."
  5. The airy huh: very common sound in Korean dramas, used when expressing disbelief with an "omg, what did you just say to me?" face
  6. Ooh-ah/우아: a Korean way of saying "wow"
  7. Ayah!/아야!: the Korean "ouch," the shorter way to say it is "Ah! 아!" Use this when you have sharp and sudden pain, i.e. papercut. Make a longer "Ah/아" if you're sick in bed, have a stomachache or are experiencing brain freeze.
  8. Ah-HH-hh/아~ (see KWOW #110 at 3:08): a long AH with a raised middle then back down is equivalent to "oh-HH-hh." Like when someone says in America, "OhhHHhhhh, I see."
  9. The suck-in-the-air-through-your-teeth sound effect (watch KWOW #110 at 3:33 for demo): use when in pain or when someone is about to do something after you told them not to, i.e. your little brother reaching for the cookie jar, your cat jumping on the dinner table.
  10. Ya/야: means "hey" in most situations. There are multiple ways of using YA. Yell it out loud when frustrated (like when you're fighting and you're at a loss for words) and if someone wronged you (i.e. a pickpocket snatched your purse).
  11. Ya, ya, ya/야, 야, 야: meaning "hey, hey, hey," this expression is often seen in Korean dramas with policemen and gangsters. Remember to include hand and arm motions as shown in the video (4:45)!
  12. The long Ya/야 with a genuine smile: sounds more like "wow" than "hey," use when impressed with something or someone, i.e. your friend can drink a ridiculous amount of soju and is still alive, you saw the Grand Canyon for the first time and are blown away by its awesome-ness.


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29 South Korean Movies You Must Watch

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29 South Korean Movies You Must Watch

In this week's episode of KWOW, we share our favorite South Korean films. We've also included ones popular amongst the general audience. Watch the video. It's more colorful than the list :)

The movies in bold are super recommended. Please check for ratings before watching.

1. My Boyfriend is Blood Type B
2. He Was Cool
3. 100 Days with Mr. Arrogant
4. My Sassy Girl

 My Sassy Girl

My Sassy Girl

6. Il Mare
7. The Good, The Bad and The Weird
8. Attack the Gas Station
9. Welcome to Dongmakgol

 Welcome to Dongmakgol

Welcome to Dongmakgol

10. My Wife is a Gangster
11. Oasis (watch here for free via Viki)
12. Secret Sunshine
13. Green Fish
14. Peppermint Candy
15. Poetry

 Poetry

Poetry

16. Spring, Summer, Fall, Winter and Spring
17. Time
18. Sympathy for Mr. Vengeance
19. Lady Vengeance
20. JSA: Joint Security Area

21. Old Boy
watch here for free via Hulu

 Old Boy

Old Boy

22. A Bittersweet Life
23. The Chaser
24. I Saw The Devil
25. The Man from Nowhere
26. Taeguki: The Brotherhood of War
27. The King and the Clown
28. Silmido
29. Hwangjini

 Hwangjini

Hwangjini



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